Notogomphus gorilla Dijkstra, 2015
Gorilla Longleg

Type locality: Buhoma, Munyaga Valley, Uganda

Diagnosis

Male is nearest to N. leroyi by its dark coloration with (a) largely black lower frons, clypeus and labrum; (b) distinct black interpleural and metapleural stripes on the thorax as well as well-defined pale postdorsal and antehumeral stripes separated from each other and the pale area of the middorsal carina; (c) widely clubbed S7-9, with S8 about as long as high or wide; (d) quite uniformly dark rufous S8-10; and (e) strongly diverging branches of epiproct. Differs, and nearer N. spinosus, by its (1) great size, Hw 36.0-38.0 mm (n = 5) rather than 31.0-34.0 mm (n = 4); (2) very small pair of basal green spots on the black labrum; (3) green rather than black occiput, although with a broad black border; (4) humped rather than smoothly curved anterior border of the posterior hamule; and (5) cerci parallel and of rather even width throughout in dorsal view, rather than converging and distally widened. Unlike both N. leroyi and N. spinosus (6) the dorsum of S7 is black with only yellow smears laterally; and (7) the cerci have a relatively small ventral tooth. [Adapted from Dijkstra, Kipping & Mézière 2015]

Habitat description

Streams shaded by forest. Probably often with coarse detritus and a gravelly and/or sandy bottom. From 1200 to 1800 m above sea level, but possibly down to 700.

Distribution

confirmed: Democratic Republic of the Congo; Rwanda; Uganda

Appendages (dorsal view)

Appendages (lateral view)

Thorax (lateral view)

Thorax (dorsal view)

Posterior hamule (lateral view)

Secondary genitalia (lateral view)

Face (frontal view)

Map citation: Clausnitzer, V., K.-D.B. Dijkstra, R. Koch, J.-P. Boudot, W.R.T. Darwall, J. Kipping, B. Samraoui, M.J. Samways, J.P. Simaika & F. Suhling, 2012. Focus on African Freshwaters: hotspots of dragonfly diversity and conservation concern. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 10: 129-134.


Reference

  • Dijkstra, K.-D.B., Mézière, N., and Kipping, J. (2015). Sixty new dragonfly and damselfly species from Africa (Odonata). Odonatologica, 44, 447-678.

Citation: Dijkstra, K.-D.B (editor). African Dragonflies and Damselflies Online. http://addo.adu.org.za/ [2020-08-12].